Closing Your Business

 

It may seem strange to read a blog about closing a business from a restructuring firm that writes repeatedly about saving businesses. But there are several reasons to close, sometimes even a reasonably successful business.

What would be some of the reasons for closing a successful business?

Maybe it’s a family owned and operated business and there is no member of the family that wants to tie their life to the business.

Well, you can always sell the business, but often that sale leaves you or some of your family tied to the business for a period or, during the sale process, the business begins to decline due to the pending change of ownership.

 

A VERY HARD DECISION …

The decision to close a business can be a hard one, even if the day-to-day work is nothing like what you imagined to be, or your initial goals seem even further away.

Many business owners hold on for too long, simply because they don’t want to close the doors and officially admit failure.

But having the courage to admit that things are not working out sooner rather that later can insure a transition to a more successful future endeavor.

 

HOW TO DECIDE?

How to make such a decision? There are several clues that it may be time to call it quits.

1. You’re out of money.

If you’re out of cash, think hard before racking up debt to continue with the enterprise.

If you have debt such as a credit line or equipment loan, think two or three times about taking on more debt.

There are business “payday loans” for almost any business.

But not being able to pay current debt and then throwing good money after bad is a certain way to limit the success of any future transition.

 

2. You’re not meeting your goals after several years.

When you started your business, you likely had a reasonably clear vision of what success would look like.

While it can often take longer than expected to hit true viability, if you have yet to hit your minimum numbers after several years, it may be time to explore other opportunities.

 

3. You’ve pivoted half a dozen times and have yet to truly take off.

In many cases, business models change as new businesses enter the marketplace.

But if you’ve tried several iterations on your offerings and aren’t finding many takers, continuing to pivot may just be putting off the inevitable.

 

4. You’ve tried many marketing avenues but haven’t gotten traction.

Most businesses have one or two marketing channels that are a natural fit.

You can tell when you’ve found a good fit when attracting a good volume of customers feels relatively straightforward, and you are generating profit.

If you’ve tried upwards of a dozen likely channels and are still not connecting, it may be time to throw in the towel.

 

5. Your competitors are outpacing you.

If your niche is dominated by two or three strong entrants who are growing at a rapid pace, and you’re having a hard time differentiating your offerings in a meaningful way, you may have a hard time ever capturing enough market share.

 

6. You’ve realized that your view of the market was flawed.

It’s impossible to have a perfect view of the market opportunity for a given business until you leap in and start testing your assumptions.

Sometimes it quickly becomes clear that some aspect of your business plan doesn’t reflect reality and you’re unlikely to be able to profitably scale your business.

 

7. You’re spending most of your time doing stuff you don’t like.

Most new business owners have a skill-set or a product that they just can’t wait to unleash upon the world.

Unfortunately, the reality, especially when a business is struggling, is that owners often spend more time dealing with ailing balance sheets than doing the activities they most enjoy and are best suited for.

 

8. Your customers and the market aren’t talking about your product or service.

Not every customer will be a diehard fan of your business, but if you’re not generating any word of mouth online or off, you may be in trouble.

 

9. You no longer want to tell others what you do.

When you’re excited about an idea, it can be hard to contain your enthusiasm.

You may find yourself leading all conversations back to exciting adventures that you’re having with a successful business.

When you no longer truly believe in what you’re doing, the opposite will probably be true-you’ll find any excuse to turn the conversation away from talk of your business.

 

There are any number of other clues that it’s time to let go, but when you feel relief at the thought of not having to support your business and when you start thinking more about making that transition than about saving the business, it is definitely time to exit.

Revitalization Partners is a Northwest business advisory and restructuring management firm with a demonstrated track record of achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. And now, we’ve written a book to help our readers understand the issues facing their businesses. You can find this compilation of our business thoughts at: https://revitalizationpartners.com/we-could-write-a-book/ or on Amazon.

We specialize in improving the operational and financial results of companies and providing hands-on expertise in virtually every circumstance, with a focus on small and mid-market organizations.

Whether your requirement is Interim Management, a Business Assessment, Revitalization and Reengineering or Receivership/Bankruptcy Support, we focus on giving you the best resolution in the fastest time with the highest possible return.

Small Business M&A: The Difference Between Success and Failure

 

Over the years, Revitalization Partner has assisted several companies with M&A transactions. We have worked with Private Equity groups, Investment Bankers and Business Brokers.

While working on these transactions, we learned how acquiring a small, seller-owned business was different from the traditional M&A process involving larger companies and, often, investment Bankers.

Most smaller companies of the size of a seller-owned business are offered for sale with business brokers. In these cases, the businesses learned of each other through being in the same or similar markets or, in one case, where RP was serving as an advisor to both companies.

 

AN EXCELLENT STRATEGIC MATCH …

It those cases, it turned out that the buyer and seller were excellent strategic matches. In one case, our clients are in a services businesses serving mostly commercial clients and the other company in in a portion of the same business mostly serving state, local and federal agencies.

The acquiring company is about three times as large as the seller and has a broader based management and financial structure. In the other case, the buyer was in the software business and the seller was in the hardware and systems business in the same market.

But with no business broker and being too small a deal for an investment banker, how does the deal get done to everyone’s satisfaction?  First, you need a starting point that everyone can agree on.

 

INDEPENDENT BUSINESS VALUATION …

In both cases, the selling companies had business valuations done by a valuation firm that was respected by the buyer. 

The buyer based the valuation on that study, with the LOI stating that the buyer would conduct due diligence to verify the valuation.

This is an easy way to reach an agreed-on price without the emotion that is often generated by valuation discussions.

The one case, the initial offer consisted of cash plus shares in the buyer. 

In that case, the buyer had a yearly valuation done by an independent third party, so the share value was fixed. 

In the other case, the Seller was to get cash and a note from the acquiring company. As the acquirer was private equity backed, the seller felt comfortable with the note.

 

 

HOW ABOUT THE CULTURE?

The other issue when doing an acquisition is one of culture. In these cases, the management of the two companies spent some time together and both believed there would be a good cultural fit. 

In one case, in order to attempt to prevent the problems that often occur between buyer and seller, it was decided that each business would continue to operate independently without a lot of top down directives from the buyer. 

In the other case, the owner and seller felt comfortable in working for the senior manager of the acquirer as he felt that manager had the experience to grow the business.

 

MISTAKES AND LESSONS LEARNED …

While it all sounds wonderful, there were several mistakes made, any of which could have killed these deals. And some lessons learned by both parties.

1. Regardless of the size of the deal, each party should use deal lawyers.  In one case, the seller use utilized their business attorneys; who are very good lawyers, but a few important tax issues popped up where buyer nor seller had the experience to address them. In the case of the other transaction, the seller utilized his personal attorney who specialized in estate planning. In his zeal to “protect” the seller, he almost protected his client out of the deal. Only the client overriding his attorney allowed the transaction to close.

2. Make sure that all parties completely understand the deal they are agreeing to. In one case, the attorney really did not fully understand the nature of the transaction and wanted to make changes at the last minute as he “learned more” about the nature of the transaction. In another case, a member of management tried to make a last-minute change the he believed was more favorable to the seller.

3. It is important to keep the negotiations open and friendly.

While the issues above created a bit of angst with both buyer and seller in both transactions, the management teams liked each other and realized that completion of the transaction would meet both parties’ goals. As a result, working through the issues never became personal.

 

BENEFITS FROM HAVING A 3rd PARTY …

The four companies were fortunate to have had a third-party involved that could fairly represent both sides and approach the sale process with mutual trust and respect.

For companies with less of a relationship between buyer and seller, there is no doubt that the use of an independent third party to shepherd the deal through the process, combined with the right attorneys, can bring a deal to conclusion.

 

Revitalization Partners is a Northwest business advisory and restructuring management firm with a demonstrated track record of achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. And now, we’ve written a book to help our readers understand the issues facing their businesses. You can find this compilation of our business thoughts at: https://revitalizationpartners.com/we-could-write-a-book/ or on Amazon.

We specialize in improving the operational and financial results of companies and providing hands-on expertise in virtually every circumstance, with a focus on small and mid-market organizations.

Whether your requirement is Interim Management, a Business Assessment, Revitalization and Reengineering or Receivership/Bankruptcy Support, we focus on giving you the best resolution in the fastest time with the highest possible return.

Mid Market Predicts Economic Downturn

 
 

Recently, KeyBank surveyed 400 middle market business owners and executives on their expectations surrounding a potential economic downturn and the implications for their businesses.

Nearly 70% of these companies are expecting an economic downturn in the US, of those, approximately 30% expect the downturn to take place in 2019 while approximately 40% expect the downturn in 2020.

Not surprisingly, most middle market companies expect the next economic downturn to have a negative impact on their business.  About 20% do not expect any impact while another 20% think a downturn could be a positive impact.

 

ALREADY TAKING STEPS …

Given that most middle market companies expect a downturn to hit soon, two-thirds are already taking steps to safeguard against it.

Most commonly, businesses are looking to reduce expenses and improve their operational efficiencies and productivity in an effort to counteract revenue losses. They are also looking to identify new markets and products to offset decreased revenue from their current product and market mix.

Increased operational efficiencies are a major focus perhaps because of the perceived threat of the economic downturn, but they will help regardless of what happens with the economy.

 

INCREASE LIQUIDITY & LOWER COSTS …

Beyond efforts to enhance operational efficiencies and identify new markets and products, over a third of mid-market companies are increasing liquidity, as well as searching for lower cost suppliers of raw materials.

Companies with higher revenue are most likely to be taking action now, both focusing on reducing costs of sales through both lower cost suppliers and reductions in headcount.

Interestingly, approximately 80%of mid-market business owners and executives remain optimistic about the outlook for their own company over the next 12 months. 

Considering that 70% of companies are expecting an economic downturn by 2020, this optimism may speak to the actions they have taken to safeguard against a downturn.

 

THE KEY QUESTION IS ALWAYS …

At the individual company level, the question is always: Were the right steps have been taken to protect the company?

Revitalization Partners recently was approached by a company that was having difficulty with their banking relationship. The company’s strategy for growing through the downturn was to grow revenue by acquiring similar companies using debt and use the increased revenue and profitability to be able to service the commitments on these loans.

As revenue slowed due to seasonality and in 2019, the weather, this company was unable to meet its loan commitments.

The company approached RP to assist them in staving off the bank while they completed additional acquisitions to improve their ability to service the debt.

In addition to the millions owed the bank, the bank also had a block of mezzanine debt and additional unsecured debt to various members of the company.

Given that they had violated bank covenants multiple times and the bank had communicated that they would not allow this to continue, the company did not have sufficient time to refinance its debt.  As a result, we were unable to assist them.

 

THE MOST IMPORTANT ACTIVITY …

While the importance of developing a strategic and tactical plan for a potential downturn cannot be overstated, one of the most important of these activities are that your company is aligned with the right bank for your organization.

All banks are not the same and the bank that is happy to sell you money and services when things are going well for your company, may not be the right bank for the time the downturn occurs.

We recently were involved with a client that had developed a strategy to weather the downturn by the acquisition of another company that provided very similar goods and services, but to a different market segment that expanded the combined company’s capability.

 

WHEN ARRANGING THE CREDIT LINE …

When arranging the acquiring company’s line of credit, the company discussed the fact that they had a plan for this strategic acquisition and the bank assured them that the necessary funds would be available. 

At the time of the acquisition, a few months later, the company was informed that the acquisition loan would not be available due to a “change of policy” by the bank.  

Fortunately, the company was sufficiently well capitalized to be able to complete the transaction.

 

DEAL WITH THE RIGHT PERSON …

The above scenarios point out that not all banks are truly “business banks” and underscores the importance of talking about the execution of your company’s strategy both when things are going well and when a downturn occurs.

And most important of all: Regardless of the title on the business card, make sure you have had the opportunity to fully explain your company’s strategy to the person at the bank who’s going to review and approve your banking transaction.

Remember, in the State of Washington, verbal agreements regarding the lending of money do not have any force of law.

 

Revitalization Partners is a Northwest business advisory and restructuring management firm with a demonstrated track record of achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. And now, we’ve written a book to help our readers understand the issues facing their businesses. You can find this compilation of our business thoughts at: https://revitalizationpartners.com/we-could-write-a-book/ or on Amazon.

We specialize in improving the operational and financial results of companies and providing hands-on expertise in virtually every circumstance, with a focus on small and mid-market organizations.

Whether your requirement is Interim Management, a Business Assessment, Revitalization and Reengineering or Receivership/Bankruptcy Support, we focus on giving you the best resolution in the fastest time with the highest possible return.

As Prices Slump, Will Farmers Survive?

 

“After years of low crop pricing and a significant backlash from foreign buyers over the Trump administration tariffs, a key government program is showing the highest loan default rate in at least nine years.

Many agricultural loans come due around January 1st of each year to give farmers and ranchers enough time to sell crops and livestock and give them more flexibility in timing interest payments for tax filing purposes.

 

IT’S BECOMING SERIOUS …

“It is beginning to become a serious situation nationwide at least in the grain crops; those that produce corn, soybeans and wheat.” Said Allen Featherstone, head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Kansas State University.

While the federal government shutdown delayed reporting, January figures show an overall rise in loan delinquencies for borrowers with direct loans from the Agricultural Department’s Farm Service Agency.

“Nationwide, 19.4 percent of FSA direct loans were delinquent in January, compared to 16.5 percent for the same month a year ago”, said David Schemm, executive director of the Farm Service Agency in Kansas. 

During the past nine years, the agency’s January delinquency rate hit a high of 18.8 percent in 2011 and fell to a low of 16.1 percent when crop prices were significantly better in 2015.

 

IT TAKES HIGH YIELDS …

While those FSA direct loan delinquencies are high, the agency is a lender of last resort for riskier agricultural borrowers who don’t qualify for commercial loans.

Its delinquency rates typically drop in subsequent months as more farmers pay off overdue notes and refinance debt.

With today’s low crop prices, it takes high yields to mitigate some of the losses and even a normal harvest or a crop failure could devastate a farm’s bottom line.

The high delinquency rates are caused by back-to-back years of low prices, with those producers who are in more financial trouble being ones who also had low yields, Featherstone said.

 

PESSIMISTIC OUTLOOK …

Some fears are also surfacing in reports such as one this month from the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, which said the outlook is pessimistic for the start of this year with respondents predicting a further decline in farm income.

About 36 percent of farm lenders who responded said they had a lower rate of loan repayment from a year earlier.

Tom Giessel said he borrowed some operating money from his local bank last year and paid it off. Giessel, who raises wheat and corn on some 2,500 acres in western Kansas, said the only thing that kept the farm economy afloat in his area was that people had pretty good fall crop yields.

Giessel, 66, said he had once gotten to the point where he didn’t have to borrow his working capital and had a relatively new set of equipment, but he has had to borrow money for the last three years just to put in a crop.

“A lot of people are in denial about what is going on, but reality is going to set in or has set in already,” Giessel said.

 

LOAN COLLATERAL REQUIREMENTS …

The February survey of rural bankers in parts of 10 Plains and Western states showed that nearly two-thirds of banks in the region raised loan collateral requirements on fears of a weakening farm income. The Rural Mainstreet survey showed nearly one-third of banks reported they rejected more farm loan applications for that reason.

Grain prices are down because farmers around the world have had above-average production for several years. But some nations’ economies are not doing as well, decreasing demand for those crops, Featherstone said. Grain prices peaked in 2012 and prices have roughly fallen 36 percent since then for soybeans, 50 percent for corn and 48 percent for wheat.

 

CONSEQUENCES OF TARIFFS …

When Trump imposed tariffs, China retaliated by stopping soybean purchases, closing the biggest U.S. market. While trade negotiations with China continue, many farmers fear it will take years for markets to recover – as it did when President Jimmy Carter imposed a grain embargo on the then-Soviet Union in 1980.

“The tariffs Trump is messing around with are not helpful at all – I don’t think anybody knows the true effect,” said Steve Morris, who farms near Hugoton in southwest Kansas.

Morris, who has been cutting back acreage to avoid borrowing money, said drought conditions last year in his area devastated his wheat yields. Trump has offered farmers subsidies to compensate for the tariffs, but they are based on harvested bushels. Morris, 73, received a subsidy payment last year for his wheat crop of only $268.

Matt Ubel, a 36-year-old Kansas farmer who bought out his parents farm in December 2016 said they have not been delinquent on their FSA loans, but acknowledged that the “payment was a challenge to make last year.”

“We’ve had trouble for several years getting operating loans.” He said, “This year doesn’t look any better.”

 

SCRAMBLING TO BORROW …

Many farmers are now scrambling to borrow money as spring planting nears and a key factor in whether farmers receive those new loans is the value of their land.

“The key issue of whether or not we have a financial crisis is what happens to land values.” Featherstone said. The jury appears to be still out.

If you or a client are concerned about getting a new loan, remember, the government is not the only source of agricultural debt.  Before panicking, talk with a specialist that can assist in raising funds from all sources.

 

Revitalization Partners is a Northwest business advisory and restructuring management firm with a demonstrated track record of achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. And now, we’ve written a book to help our readers understand the issues facing their businesses. You can find this compilation of our business thoughts at: https://revitalizationpartners.com/we-could-write-a-book/ or on Amazon.

We specialize in improving the operational and financial results of companies and providing hands-on expertise in virtually every circumstance, with a focus on small and mid-market organizations.

Whether your requirement is Interim Management, a Business Assessment, Revitalization and Reengineering or Receivership/Bankruptcy Support, we focus on giving you the best resolution in the fastest time with the highest possible return.

How M&A Deals Are Like Marriages and What To Do About Failed Expectations

 

This month, the Principals of Revitalization Partners assisted by a Partner of a Private Equity firm, an operational restructuring manager and an Investment Banker, presented a panel discussion at the Seattle meeting of the Association for Corporate Growth with the title listed above.

The concept came from a study by Grant Thornton entitled “Defining What Is Vital For Deal Success.”

 

TRULY STAGGERING DATA …

Some of the data presented in the study is truly staggering when you consider the amount of money available for M&A transactions and the valuation multiple that are found in the market today.

From strategy to implementation, there is a significant opportunity to capture greater value from M&A transactions.

The survey supporting this study showed that only 14%of survey respondents found that their deals exceeded their initial expectations for income or rate of return.

Only 36.8% agreed that efficient M&A execution was a well understood core competency of their company.

 

DESPITE RECORD HIGH VALUATIONS …

Despite valuations being at an all time high, competition for deals continues to increase.

As a result, it’s more important to understand the due diligence process and realize that in addition to understanding the strategy behind the deal, understanding the impact of the financial, operational and most importantly, cultural compatibilities are critical to a successful transaction.

The survey showed that companies can attain much greater clarity at the beginning of the process. Only 38.2% of respondents indicated that they were very clear on precisely what acquisition targets they should pursue and only 32.5% were clear on what they should be paying.

As a result, M&A transactions often fail to add shareholder value.

 

STEPS TO AVOID FAILURE …

When evaluating a deal, there are several steps to take to attempt to head off a failure:

1. Ask hard questions and test your team’s financial assumptions
2. Scrutinize deal protection terms and, in hostile situations, defensive measures
3. Learn why management seeks to pursue (or oppose) a transaction.
4. Carefully review any analysis prepared by management or financial advisors and verify Key assumptions.

 

WHEN ASKED TO RATE SUCCESS …

When asked to rate their success at identifying specific risks, survey respondents confirmed that a handful of issues were overlooked.

  • Overall, 39,7% rated themselves strong at customer retention;
  • 42.7% rated themselves high on employee retention and
  • 39.7% thought they were good at financial reporting compatibility.

 

 

MAJOR REASON EXPECTATIONS NOT MET …

Finally, we get to the major reason that most M&A transactions end up not meeting expectations; that of cultural issues.

There are a few tenets that are required for successful cultural integration.

1.  Never ignore or understate cultural issues. According to Peter Drucker, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”
2.  Address the cultural compatibility early in the process and develop a strategy for addressing problems.
3.  Conduct cultural due diligence; Look at multiple cultural dynamics and organizational beliefs.
4.  Understand why you are buying the target company and value those reasons and their culture.
5.  Reinforce commonalities and focus on things that you both share and value.
6.  Address differences, openly discuss issues and integrate where possible.
7.  Look beyond the obvious. You may have similar missions and values, but differences in degrees of hierarchy and attitude can derail the process.

 

ALL DOWNSTREAM REACTIONS …

All these downstream reactions to a merger can have a negative impact on both top and bottom lines which can undermine the initial deal valuation.

The challenge after the close isn’t always making 1 plus 1 equal 3; it’s sometimes insuring 1 plus 1 still equals 2.

And lastly, if you are considering or involved in an acquisition or merger and have concerns about the issues, look for help.

Members of Revitalization Partners have supported transactions on behalf of companies and private equity groups on both the buy and sell sides and are currently involved in a buy side transaction.

 

Revitalization Partners is a Northwest business advisory and restructuring management firm with a demonstrated track record of achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. And now, we’ve written a book to help our readers understand the issues facing their businesses. You can find this compilation of our business thoughts at:
https://revitalizationpartners.com/we-could-write-a-book/ or on Amazon.

We specialize in improving the operational and financial results of companies and providing hands-on expertise in virtually every circumstance, with a focus on small and mid-market organizations.

Whether your requirement is Interim Management, a Business Assessment, Revitalization and Reengineering or Receivership/Bankruptcy Support, we focus on giving you the best resolution in the fastest time with the highest possible return.

When is a Lie a Lie?

 

There has been a lot of press recently regarding people in positions of power, who have lied to advance their agenda, gain more power or take advantage of someone else to enrich themselves.

The concept of lying and deception has gained a lot of attention, however, this issue has been a problem since the beginning of time.

Lies can range from being a “little white lie” on a resume to a massive deception such as the Madoff Ponzi scheme where over $50 billion was stolen from clients.

However, the consequences of getting caught lying are not always in the forefront of someone’s mind when the lie occurs. The truth is, there are almost always repercussions for lying, even for little white lies.

 

SIGNIFICANT CONSEQUENCES …

From a business perspective: lying, deception or misrepresentation can have significant personal and financial consequences.

Take for example the famous Enron case, where several high-powered corporate executives are now in prison as a result of creating a massive deception and for misleading shareholders and creditors.

Another example is the Martha Stewart case, where she spent time in jail for lying about a stock transaction. 

Or, the little white lie a CEO tells in the board room about how well a company is going to perform in the next quarter, who then find themselves out of job when the results do not materialize.

The best way to relate to why lying has broad negative consequences is a quote by Nietzsche, a German philosopher:

I am not upset that you lied to me, I’m upset that from now on, I can’t believe you”.

 

 

 

ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS …

Telling falsehoods can not only impact one’s personal and financial situation, it’s also bad for your health.

According to Linda Stroh, a professor emeritus at Loyola University, even seemingly insignificant lies will take a toll on your health.

It takes a lot of negative physical and mental energy to maintain a lie,” said Stroh. “This is energy you could’ve spent working on creative solutions for your business or enhancing your products.”

A host of physical problems can emerge from a lying mind, too.

Studies show that the more you lie, the higher your stress level, heart rate, and blood pressure rise.”

 

 

THE EXPECTATION IS …

There is no question that when it comes to business, the usual expectation is that C Level executives and managers will tell the truth.

While this is the standard, one must go beyond accepting what is presented as the truth.

In fact, the concept of “trust but verify” is one that should exist in every board room and in every company and is one we use in our business dealings every day.

 

 

IT’S NOT ENOUGH TO …

We find in our business, that just accepting someone’s word when we hear their explanation regarding problems facing their company or, who is at fault for them, is not enough.

In fact, we find that the initial information we hear is often not accurate.

When we ultimately discover the truth, we find that the executive is either not aware of what is really happening in their business, or they are trying to cover up incompetence, or sometimes outright fraud.

We also find that a number of warning signs were evident for others to see. 

In reality, in most situations, there are boards of directors and outside auditors involved, that have a duty to view the business objectively and challenge management for accurate explanations.

They have a fiduciary obligation to shareholders or creditors to be aware of the warning signs and to take action to deal with the issues, particularly if the company enters the “Zone of Insolvency”.

Our approach is to quickly understand a company’s problems and to develop a plan to address the issues and is founded in this essential principle of “trust but verify”.

Likewise, it is extremely important for anyone in a position of authority as a chief executive, board member, or outside advisor to use this concept as a method to exercise their legitimate duties to hold everyone accountable.

 

Revitalization Partners is a Northwest business advisory and restructuring management firm with a demonstrated track record of achieving the best possible outcomes for our clients. And now, we’ve written a book to help our readers understand the issues facing their businesses. You can find this compilation of our business thoughts at: https://revitalizationpartners.com/we-could-write-a-book/ or on Amazon.

We specialize in improving the operational and financial results of companies and providing hands-on expertise in virtually every circumstance, with a focus on small and mid-market organizations.

Whether your requirement is Interim Management, a Business Assessment, Revitalization and Reengineering or Receivership/Bankruptcy Support, we focus on giving you the best resolution in the fastest time with the highest possible return.